Spaying and neutering saves lives. Three to four million homeless cats and dogs are euthanized every year in the United States.

Low Cost Spay & Neuter Clinics

Check website for organizations near you listed under low Cost Spay & Neuter, then click on the organization near you for location, dates, times and fees.


West GA Mobile Vet

West Mobile Vet

770-942-4984    

www.WestMobileVet.com

logo2

West Georgia Spay & Neuter Clinic

525 E. Montgomery St, Ste B – Villa Rica, GA 30180

          678-840-8072              

www.WestGeorgiaSpayNeuter.com

Project Catsnip
Project Cat Snip

770-455-7077

www.ProjectCatSnip.com

Stop Pet Overpopulation Together (SPOT)

Stop Pet Overpopulation Together (SPOT)

www.SPOTsociety.org

 

atlanta-humane-society-ga$35 Spay/Neuter Program Available

404-875-5331

http://atlantahumane.org/services/low-cost-spay-neuter/

Logo-fixpetgeorgia266300 Powers Ferry Road Suite 600-205 Atlanta, GA 30339

(404) 835-4100

info@fixgapets.com        www.fixgapets.com

lifelineLifeLine Animal Project
P.O. Box 15466
Atlanta, Georgia 30333
(404) 292-8800
Fax: (404) 292-8804
info@lifelineanimal.org

Monthly Low-Cost Vaccine Clinics


West GA Mobile VetWest Mobile Vet will be on-site at the Douglas County Animal Shelter 1755 County Services Road (adjacent to the Cedar Mtn Landfill) Douglasville, Georgia 30134 two Wednesday’s a month from 9 AM – 5 PM offering low cost vaccines, testing, medications, health checks, treatments, spay/neuters, surgeries and more!

For a listing of dates and scheduling times visit http://westmobilevet.com



Upcoming 2016 Schedule:

  • Wednesday January 6th &  20th from 9 AM – 5 PM
  • Wednesday February 3rd & 17th from 9 AM – 5 PM
Drop off for surgery 8-8:30. Surgery/dental require appointments.
Vaccine/Check up/ Sick – No appointment needed 9am-5pm.



logo2West Georgia Spay Neuter Clinic holds twice monthly low-cost vaccines clinics at 535 E. Montgomery Street, Suite B Villa Rica, GA 30180.

Visit www.westgeorgiaspayneuter.com or call 678-840-8072 for dates and times.


Upcoming 2016 Schedule:

  • Janury 16th: West Georgia Spay Neuter Clinic. 9:00 AM – Noon
  • February 20th: West Georgia Spay Neuter Clinic. 9:00 AM – Noon
  • March 19th: West Georgia Spay Neuter Clinic. 9:00 AM – Noon


Project Catsnip

CatSnip will hold a low-cost FELINE Spay/Neuter Clinic and Low-Cost Dog/Cat Vaccine clinic at the Douglas County Animal Services 1755 County Services Road Douglasville, GA 30134 from 9 AM – 2:30 PM two Friday’s a month starting in March.  Drop off for surgery is 7:30 AM. Contact CatSnip at info@projectcatsnip.com or 770-455-7077 or http://projectcatsnip.com for more info.



309917_264956566921546_1552532888_nKritters Country Club holds a low-cost vaccine clinic with Dr. Theresa Montgomery on the 2nd Saturday of every month from 10 AM – 2 PM at 7622 Bankhead Highway Douglasville, GA 30134.

Visit www.kritterscountryclub.com or call 770-489-7500 for more details.

225X401Pause 4 Paws Grooming & Salon in Douglasville now holds monthly & bi-monthly low-cost Vaccines and Wellness Checks from 1-4 PM at 3770 W. County Line Rd. Suite F Douglasville, GA 30135.  Dr. Theresa Montgomery will be the licensed vet.  Visit www.mypause4paws.com or call 404-692-5393 for more details.



Myths and Facts About Spaying and Neutering


MYTH: My pet will get fat and lazy.

FACT: The truth is that most pets get fat and lazy because their owners feed them too much and don’t give them enough exercise.


MYTH: It’s better to have one litter first.

FACT: Medical evidence indicates just the opposite. In fact, the evidence shows that females spayed before their first heat are typically healthier. Many veterinarians now sterilize dogs and cats as young as eight weeks of age. Check with your veterinarian about the appropriate time for these procedures.


MYTH: My children should experience the miracle of birth.

FACT: Even if children are able to see a pet give birth—which is unlikely, since it usually occurs at night and in seclusion—the lesson they will really learn is that animals can be created and discarded as it suits adults. Instead, it should be explained to children that the real miracle is life and that preventing the birth of some pets can save the lives of others.


MYTH: But my pet is a purebred.

FACT: So is at least one out of every four pets brought to animal shelters around the country. There are just too many dogs and cats—mixed breed and purebred.


MYTH: I want my dog to be protective.

FACT: Spaying or neutering does not affect a dog’s natural instinct to protect home and family. A dog’s personality is formed more by genetics and environment than by sex hormones.


MYTH: I don’t want my male dog or cat to feel like less of a male.

FACT: Pets don’t have any concept of sexual identity or ego. Neutering will not change a pet’s basic personality. He doesn’t suffer any kind of emotional reaction or identity crisis when neutered.


MYTH: But my dog (or cat) is so special, I want a puppy (or kitten) just like her.

FACT: A dog or cat may be a great pet, but that doesn’t mean her offspring will be a carbon copy. Professional animal breeders who follow generations of bloodlines can’t guarantee they will get just what they want out of a particular litter. A pet owner’s chances are even slimmer. In fact, an entire litter of puppies or kittens might receive all of a pet’s (and her mate’s) worst characteristics.


MYTH: It’s too expensive to have my pet spayed or neutered.

FACT: The cost of spaying or neutering depends on the sex, size, and age of the pet, your veterinarian’s fees, and a number of other variables. But whatever the actual price, spay or neuter surgery is a one-time cost—a relatively small cost when compared to all the benefits. It’s a bargain compared to the cost of having a litter and ensuring the health of the mother and litter; two months of pregnancy and another two months until the litter is weaned can add up to significant veterinary bills and food costs if complications develop. Most importantly, it’s a very small price to pay for the health of your pet and the prevention of the births of more unwanted pets.


MYTH: I’ll find good homes for all the puppies and kittens.

FACT: You may find homes for all of your pet’s litter. But each home you find means one less home for the dogs and cats in shelters who need good homes. Also, in less than one year’s time, each of your pet’s offspring may have his or her own litter, adding even more animals to the population. The problem of pet overpopulation is created and perpetuated one litter at a time